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Fremont County's Daily Newspaper

News of Riverton, Lander and Fremont County, Wyoming, from the Ranger's award winning journalists.

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Tuesday notes

Mar 6, 2012 - By Steven R. Peck

Wyoming wind

We all know the word "hellacious" and how it is used. But is "howlacious" a word? If it is, it would be a good one to describe the wind that ripped across Fremont County during various portionss of the weekend.

There is bound to have been some damage done, but we have little reason to complain when comparing our wind to the deadly, terrifying storms that killed dozens of people in states farther east.

Better yet for Fremont County, when the worst was over in the middle of the night Saturday, Sunday dawned like spring. Keep an ear open for the song of the red-winged blackbird. The season is near.

Page 6, please

In recent weeks we've made mention a few times of our new newspaper production system called "direct to plate." It changes the step between laying out the pages on the computer screen by the editors and producing the aluminum printing plates that go on the press. In fact, the new system eliminates that step.

Thursday was our first day trying it out, meaning Saturday night, when the Sunday paper was being produced, was our third.

And, by now, our sports readers know that a production error, which was related to learning the new system, occurred somewhere along the line.

The result was that page C-6, which contained a full six columns of public notice advertising, was published twice, while page C-4, with pictures and copy about state and regional basketball tournaments for Fremont County high schools, didn't get published at all.

Our apologies for the mistake, particularly at such a high-interest point in the basketball season.

We have expanded our normal allotment of sports, and today's edition carries all the interrupted or omitted stories in their entirety.

Ranger online

Incidentally, Sunday's page 6 appeared as intended on dailyranger.com, the newly redesigned Ranger website that's been up and running for a couple of weeks now.

We hope readers are noticing and enjoying the new dailyranger.com.

What you are seeing now is an unobstructed preview, but it won't last much longer. Shortly we'll be redirecting access to the full site in favor of our paid subscribers, who will have access to everything (we'll be adding some new features for subscribers once the preview period ends).

Non-subscribers wil have access to some of the content, but not as much as the full subscribers do.

Don't worry. Newspaper subscriptions are one of the great informational bargains in existence, and we intend for dailyranger.com to follow that pattern. Be watching in print and online for details about this evolution of the site.

Camelot

Walk the halls of the big Robert A. Peck Arts Center on the Central Wyoming College campus in Riverton and you'll see framed photographs of all the community theater plays staged there since the facility opened in 1983.

It's a good thing there is a lot of wall space at the arts center, because the college's theater department has mounted a formidable number of shows over the past three decades -- more than 100 of them, in fact. The wall is a nice tribute to them all.

The latest was "Camelot," which concluded Sunday with its seventh performance with a Sunday matinee before a good house. It had all the ingredients of successful community theater: a big cast, an enthusiastic production, an appreciative audience, and a mixture of talent that, under careful, encouraging direction, proved again that it can pull off just about any show with a flair. Well done -- again.

Bob Peck

Today marks the fifth anniversary of the death of Robert A. Peck, the Riverton native who served as publisher of our newspaper for 58 years.

During those decades, stretching for the 1940s to 2007, he also became the community's towering figure of public service and civic leadership, and its great statesman, facts confirmed and reiterated time and again by most who knew and worked with him.

If there is a lesson to carry forward from his example, it is this: Believe in the place you live, and work to make it better.

Here's to a good week.

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Central Wyoming College